The Four Principles

March 24, 2017 | by: John Guerra | 0 comments

Posted in: John Guerra | Tags: First Baptist Sanger, blog, John Guerra

More and more doctors are running their practices like an assembly line. One fella walked into a doctor's office and the receptionist asked him what he had. He said, "Shingles." So she took down his name, address, medical insurance number and told him to have a seat. Fifteen minutes later a nurse's aid came out and asked him what he had. He said, "Shingles." So she took down his height, weight, a complete medical history and told him to wait in the examining room. A half-hour later a nurse came in and asked him what he had. He said, "Shingles." So she gave him a blood test, a blood pressure test, an electrocardiogram, told him to take off all his clothes and wait for the doctor. An hour later the doctor came in and asked him what he had. He said,
“Shingles." The doctor said, "Where?" He said, "Outside in the truck. Where do you want them?"

I Corinthians 10:31-33: “Therefore, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. Give no offense, either to the Jews or to the Greeks or to the church of God, just as I also please all men in all things, not seeking my own profit, but the profit of many, that they may be saved.”

Sometimes we just ask the wrong questions. The question of “Why can’t we eat meat?” was not the issue. The question to ask is, “Does this bring glory to God and does it edify the church?” Paul lays out some principles by which the Christian is to order his life.

* “Whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” There is no part of our life or conduct that should not be for the glory of God. How do you glorify God if you damage the conscience of a weaker Christian?

* Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God. Do not be offensive; cause no trouble if you can help it. Be as sensitive a Christian as possible to everybody, non-Christians and Christians. The test of Christian freedom lies in the claims it makes not for self but for others.

* Live a life that is appealing to others without compromising our principles. This life demonstrates care for others, and when Paul speaks of efforts to please all men he’s not referring to compromise, but to concern. He’s referring to his own actions, not approving all of theirs.

* The fourth principle develops from the third. His ultimate concern is that they may be saved. The exercise of Christian freedom should have an evangelistic concern. Paul cared about his relationship with others because he is concerned about their salvation. What a difference the church would be if we operated by these principles of bringing glory to God, love, edifying the church, and reaching the lost.

Comments for this post have been disabled